Category Archives: Episode Reactions

Fruits Basket Episode One Reaction

Welcome, weebs, to Animated Observations


Well, it would not be The Aniwriter if I was not a weeks late on literally everything. Also, apologies again for the lack of posts for the last week, been caught up in schoolwork. Now, since that is out of the way, lets talk about one of the more anticipated shows of the season: Fruits Basket.

For those who are unfamiliar with the franchise, Fruits Basket is a story about Tohru, a young girl who, after losing both her parents and moving in with her grandfather, decides that she does not want to be a burden and starts living in the woods. After Yuki, a classmate of hers finds this out, he invites Tohru to start living with them. However, soon afterwards Tohru finds out the Soma’s secret: That they are animals.

Ever since the airing of the original anime adaptation by Studio Deen back in 2001, Fruits Basket has been a beloved series by almost all anime fans alike. Even with it being intended as more of a shoujo romance, the show caught on with so many people that it became incredibly popular. So, does the newest adaptation of Natsuki Takaya’s manga live up to the hype of the original?

Well, its hard to say. I’ll be fully transparent and honest hear: I don’t actually remember that much of the original series. I watched it back when I was in seventh grade, a turbulent year for me personally, and during that time it provided a lot of unexpected comfort. It might seem a bit cliche, but I related a lot to both Tohru and Kyo because of their loner status.

Still, even despite largely not living up to today’s standards of good animation and quality, the show definitely still has a lot of nostalgic value.

The newest adaptation of the show does a lot to live up to the spirit of the original. I do like the way they chosen to introduce the characters, emphasizing Tohru’s social front in order to mask her troubles, only to fall down from exhaustion near the middle of the episode. Yuki and Shigure also seem to be fairly faithful to their original characters as well, with Yuki being the cool, mysterious prince and Shigure being the pervy twenty-something.

I am also aware that their was a lot of hype around the English Dub since most of the original voice actors were recast in their role, but I opted to watch the show in the Japanese, so I did not get a chance to hear it. However, I do also remember the dub quite fondly, so more points for that I guess.


How do you guys feel about the newest Fruits Basket adaptation? Let me know in the comments below. Also, if you would like to support The Aniwriter or are just feeling generous, consider donating on Ko-fi, or using one of the affiliate links down below:

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Check out my writing blog, Solidly Liquid!

If you can’t, or just don’t feel like it, no worries. Thank you all for reading, and goodbye, for now, friends!

Showa Genroku Rakugo Shinju Episode One Reaction

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Even with the little information I had about the series beforehand, I have been excited to finally sit down and watch Showa Genroku Rakugo Shinju for the first time. When I found out what Rakugo even was, I was intrigued and, from that point on, always kept the show in the back of my mind. Now, having seen it, I can most certainly confirm its quality.

Showa Genroku Rakugo Shinju is the story of an ex-convict, now released from jail, who is looking to restart his life. After hearing a Rakugo performance from Yakumo, one of the most famous Rakugo performers, in prison, he decides that he is going to dedicate his life to the art, and seeks him out. Yakumo, having never taken an apprentice before, decides to take on the ex-con, who he now calls Yotaro.

Seeing as how the first episode is actually forty-plus minutes long, the first episode has a lot going on, but it never actually feels like that while watching it, which is a good characteristic. Instead of doing a huge information dump for its first epiosde, the show ops to tell its story a bit more naturally, giving more of an understand of both Yotaro, but also Konatsu, who’s struggle of being a female in the exclusively male world of Rakugo looks to be a central part of the story.

Yakumo, and his history with Konatsu’s father, also seem like an interesting part of the story which I am happy is going to be explored in the next episode, especially considering that it is heavily implied that Konatsu believes Yakumo killed her father out of jealously.

I am also just a big fan of the idea of Rakugo itself, which has a comedy style much more focused on narrative payoff and delivery rather than over the top and random humor. In this way, Rakugo actually feels a lot like today’s modern standup, which relies on a lot of short stories, usually told from the perspective of the comedian.

Raguko’s first episode was welcomed experience that definitely leaves me wanting to finish the series, which I a probably going to do right after I finish writing this post.


Have you all seen Showa Genroku Raguko Shinju? How do you guys feel about it? Let me know in the comments below. Also, if you would like to support The Aniwriter or are just feeling generous, consider donating on ko-fi or using on of the affiliate links down below:

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Check out my writing blog, Solidly Liquid!

If you can’t, or just don’t feel like it, no worries. Thank you all for reading, and goodbye, for now, friends!

Kaguya-Sama: Love is War Episode One Reaction

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Well, after a lot of hesitation and general apathy towards this show, I finally decided to give it a go. I guess something just finally clicked for me and I realized that maybe there was something worth checking out solely based on the premise. I mean, an ultimate tsundere showdown does sound pretty funny. So, what did we get?

A decent amount actually. Kaguya-Sama: Love is War focuses on the President and Vice-President of Shuchiin Academy, Miyuki Shirogane and Kaguya Shinomiya, respectively. The two have strong feelings for each other, however, both of them believe that, if they to the other, they lose. And so, the war begins.

Kaguya-sama is a show that, even while I was looking through the winter season before it started, I had fairly low expectations of. It seemed like a fairly gimmicky slice-of-life comedy that was not going to go anywhere.

However, after watching the first episode, I definitely see the appeal. While the two main characters personalities did not ring as loudly as I would have expected for a comedy show in the first episode, the jokes still came through and had me actually laughing, which is more than I can say for a lot of other comedy anime.

Shirogane and Shinomiya are both fun to watch, and there similar levels of intelligence I had me wondering what kind of mind games they were going to be playing next.

The only thing that really concerns me about the series is whether or not it can continue being funny beyond its initial few episodes. Some formats work for a whole series, and other jokes are only good for a few episodes, and I am just not sure if Kaguya-Sama’s format is a whole series one or not.

Still though, based on its first episode, if you have not seen it, I would give it a go.


How do you guys feel about Kaguya-Sama’s first episode? I know were half-way through the season at this point, but I’m still curious. Let me know in the comments below. Also, if you would like to support The Aniwriter, or are just feeling generous, consider donating on ko-fi or using one of my affiliate links:

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If you can’t, or just don’t feel like it, no worries. Thank you all for reading, and goodbye, for now, friends!

Dororo Episode One Reaction

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As I talked about in my most anticipated anime of winter 2019 list, as soon as I looked up the history of Dororo, I was immediately interested in it. The story of a kid who lost most of his body parts because his dad made a deal with Demons, and now he goes around slaying said demons in order to get those body parts back. So, how did Dororo turn out?

Well, for the most part pretty well. The story centers around Daigo, a prominent government official who makes a deal with Demons and tells them that they can have anything that they want in exchange for power. The Demons then decided to take the body parts of his newly born son, at which point Daigo decides to get rid of his son against the will of his mother, and so he is sent down the river by one of his aids. Sixteen years later and Dororo, a child thief meets up with Hyakkimaru, a mysterious man who looks barely human.

One thing that the show does really well right off the bat is its animation. Sure, its nothing incredible, but it definitely looks above average, especially the fight scene near the end. Most of this can be attributed to studio MAPPA, who regularly has fairly high production value.

Now, if that felt like a fairly generic compliment, its because it was. To tell you the truth, I don’t have any unique opinions on the show’s first episode because overall, while it was definitely good, there was nothing that stood out as unique one way or the other.

One minor complaint I have about the show personally is that it feels odd that it is titled Dororo when what seems like the obvious focus of the show is Hyakkimaru. This may just be ignorance because I don’t know a ton about where the story goes from here, but it still seems like an odd choice.

Again, I don’t have to much of a unique opinion on this show, so I’ll spare you a long-winded post, but I do think that it has an interesting premise and I will definitely be keeping up with it to see where it goes from here.


How do you guys feel about Dororo? Let me know in the comments below. Also, if you would like to support The Aniwriter, or are just feeling generous, consider donating on Ko-fi or using one of my affiliate links the next time you buy stuff:

Buy Me a Coffee at ko-fi.com

Check out my writing blog, Solidly Liquid!

If you can’t, or just don’t feel like it, no worries. Thank you all for reading, and goodbye, for now, friends!

The Rising of the Shield Hero Episode One Reaction

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As I said in my reaction to episode one of The Promised Neverland, the point of a first episode is to draw people in and get them invested in the stakes of a given story, and to The Rising of the Shield Hero’s credit, it did do that for me, and probably for a many others as well. The problem I have with the show is the way in which it does this, but I will explain more in a second.

The Rising of the Shield hero follows Iwatani Naotumi, a college student from Japan who one day gets transported from his world to a vaguely familiar fantasy world. The reason? Naotumi is one of four cardinal heroes whose destiny it is to save the world from destruction. However, being the shield hero makes him the loser of the pack, and quickly after being summoned to this new world, he finds himself being accused of rape by his only other party member Myna, and is then left to train by himself.

One of the things that come across as immediately problematic about the show’s first episode is the implication of its events. Now, before you anyone decides to call me an SJW cuck, I understand your feelings about everything being called problematic, and in some cases, I would agree that things get called problematic solely to ruin people’s enjoyment of said things. However, let me explain specifically why this first episode is different.

For the entirety of the forty-five plus minute first episode, we are introduced to exactly two females characters, Myna and the slave girl at the end of the episode. Myna, who ends up joining Naotumi’s party, is portrayed as sexually deviant and only using Naotumi for his money, and the show even goes as far to show him as falsely accusing him of rape. It is then, of course, revealed that she did all of this intentionally, and she is even shown with an evil smile on her face near the middle of the episode. Now, consider this: since the slave girl at the end does not have any lines outside just crying in a cage, that makes the sole character traits represented by women in the show so far evil and subservience.

Now, in regards to Myna specifically, there is nothing wrong in a vacuum with saying what Myna did was wrong and that false rape accusations are wrong, those things are absolutely true. The problem comes with the implication. Again, since Myna is one of only two female representatives in the show, the implication is that she is representative of most or even all women, which then completely justifies any terrible behavior by the main character towards other female characters.

I do, however, want to make something abundantly clear: I am not saying that if you like and enjoy this show that you are a bad person. In fact, other than this one, admittedly large part of the show’s premise, I actually thought it was a fairly interesting addition to the Isekai genre. I would just ask that you consider these things while watching the show.


How do you guys feel about the first episode of The Rising of the Shield Hero? Let me know in the comments below. Also, if you want to support The Aniwriter or are just feeling generous, consider supporting me on Ko-fi or using one of my affiliate links to buy stuff:

Buy Me a Coffee at ko-fi.com

Check out my writing blog, Solidly Liquid!

If you can’t, or just don’t feel like it, no worries. Thank you all for reading, and goodbye, for now, friends!

The Promised Neverland Episode One Reaction

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I’m a bit late on starting these for this season, but a lot of my work ethic has been sorely diminished by my inability to get any sleep whatsoever.

Part of the reason that I personally talk about shows in this one episode format is that it is interesting to see how much effort a show puts into drawing an audience in. That is the most important aspect of a first episode, after all. However, I think I can safely say that after watching The Promised Neverland that this is by far one of the best first episodes I have ever seen, and I promise you I do not say that lightly.

For those who are not aware, The Promised Neverland is a story about The Grace Field House, an orphanage run by a woman who all the kids refer to as “momma.” Emma, Norman, and Ray are the smartest kids in their family of 38, and one day find out something they weren’t supposed to. As one of the orphans Cindy is leaving, Norman and Emma find out that the reason the kids are being held there is to feed Demons.

Part of the reason that I said this is one of the best first episodes I have ever seen is because it has a lot of really good set-up for the story to come. One example of this is the way it builds up a lot of dramatic tension in the span of just twenty minutes. A lot of the credit for that can be owed to the music. When the kids go near the gate that momma tells them to never go near, the music gets creepier, alluding to the fate that is revealed at the end of the first episode.

There is also a scene where the creepy music picks up again, but instead of the kids being near the wall, the shots focus on the numbers that are on their backs, as well as when the kids are taking some kind of test in a dimly lit room. Both of these allude to the fact that the demons that momma is selling the kids to are looking for a certain “quality” kid, and that eventually they want to come back for higher quality kids.

Another great part of the set-up of The Promised Neverland is the way the three main characters, Norman, Emma, and Ray, are established quickly and effectively. The best example of this is during their game of tag. After playing a game of tag in which Norman wins fairly easily, the main three take a break and discuss their strengths. Emma is established as the most athletic of the group, Norman is the most intellectual of the three, and Ray is given the title of the best tactician.

There is honestly so much to talk about in regards to the show’s first episode that I think I might even do another post entirely to just so I can give it more praise. However, if you take away one thing from this post, it’s that, even if the rest of The Promised Neverland ends up being mediocre or bad, you owe it to yourself to watch at least the first episode.


What do you guys think of the first episode of The Promised Neverland? How does it compare to the other first episodes of the season? Let me know in the comments below. If you guys want to support The Aniwriter, or are just feeling generous, consider donating on Ko-fi or using one of my affiliate links to buy stuff:

Buy Me a Coffee at ko-fi.com

Check out my writing blog, Solidly Liquid!

If you can’t, or just don’t feel like it, no worries. Thank you all for reading, and goodbye, for now, friends!

The Pet Girl of Sakurasou Episode One Reaction

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If AMVs on YouTube tell me anything, its that a surprising amount of people seem to like The Pet Girl of Sakurasou. Even before I knew what the name of the show was, I would see it in virtually any anime-related edit or really anything of that nature. All of this made me extremely curious, and so I decided to check the show out for myself.

Source: Crunchyroll.com

To be honest, though, I actually do not know how much there is to say about this show. For starters, you have Sorata, the high school boy main protagonist, his friend Nanami, who looks to be a love interest of Sorata, Mashiro, who is the new girl in town, and everyone else in Sakura hall who all seem to be extremely socially inept. I say this not to leave out any description of their personality, but to point out that it feels like they do not have any personality.

As someone who has watched enough slice of life romances to know where this is going, I can’t help but feel like I am setting myself up to be disappointed. If Pet Girl of Sakaurasou is like those other romance shows, Sorata will spend a bunch of time with Mashiro, fall in love with her, and then the show will end without any actual progression.

However, maybe I am being a bit too cynical with my episode one analysis. After all, there have been other shows that did get to reach a romantic conclusion, like Toradora. Overall, though, my expectations are fairly low, but I am also opened to being surprised by this show. Maybe Pet Girl of Sakurasou will give me something I was not expecting.


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If you can’t, or just don’t feel like it, no worries. Thank you all for reading, and goodbye, for now, friends!

Zombieland Saga Episode One Reaction

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I think it would be fair to say that, despite my recommendations of series like The Devil is a Part-Timer, I have not actually done a whole lot of discussion on Comedy focused anime. Most of the time, when I am watching comedy anime, my analytical side tends to just turn off in favor of having fun. However, since Zombieland Saga was one of the most popular shows of the last season, I figured it would be worth my time to watch at least one episode.

The premise is fairly simple. Sakura Minamoto is a second-year high school student who, on the first day of the school year, gets hit by a truck and dies. What to her feels like waking up only a few hours later she soon finds out has been ten years, and that she was revived by Tatsumi Koutarou, who wants to put together a zombie idol group in order to save Saga.

Much like The Devil is a Part-Timer, Zombieland Saga’s premise is both insanely stupid and yet immediately funny. The idea of some random dude who barely explains himself to the newly revived Sakura and proceeds to just make an idol group out of the lot that he has assembled is pretty hilarious.

Of course, it can only be funny for so long without some decent execution of the comedy itself, and it that department Zombieland Saga delivers. It does not take a long-winded explanation to find the opening scene in which the bright and cheery, ready to conquer the world Sakura Minamoto gets hit by a truck absolutely hilarious. Sure, at the end of the day, it is fairly dark humor, but it hits well nonetheless.

Another hilarious moment in the first episode is the metal concert scene, in which the main characters all just start screaming on top of a random metal instrumental, and then the crowd gets into it. The way the girls are animated leaning all the way back into their headbanging is probably the funniest part of the who scene.

Overall, the first episode was fantastic. It pulled no punches in its comedic execution and definitely left me wanting more, so I will probably continue with the series until the end. If you have not watched it yet, check it out.


How do you all feel about Zombieland Saga? Let me know in the comments below. If you all would like to support the Aniwriter or are just feeling generous, consider donating to me on Ko-fi or using my affiliate links to buy stuff:

Buy Me a Coffee at ko-fi.com

Check out my writing blog, Solidly Liquid!

If you can’t, or just don’t feel like it, no worries. Thank you all for reading, and goodbye, for now, friends!

Fairytail Final Season Episode One Reaction

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I can say without a shadow of a doubt that Fairytail will, forever and always, have a place in my heart. The show has been with me since I figured out what anime actually was. In fact, the first time I started watching the show, I went through 37 episodes in one sitting. Sure, I didn’t get any sleep that night, but I enjoyed myself, nonetheless. 

Erza staring into the sky

With that being said, as I have grown more and more over the years and my tastes have changed drastically, I have noticed quite a few of the flaws that are riddled throughout the show. Whether it is the repetitive character designs that Hiro Mashima uses for nearly all of his characters or the painfully generic villains that seem to come through in every arc, with the exception of a few, Fairytail often embodies the worst of generic shonen action traits. As such, my expectations for the show have gradually lowered over time in order to still get so enjoyment out of the show. 

Despite what I said in the last paragraph, the final season’s first episode did actually entertain me quite a bit. Maybe it is just the fact that the show has been off the air for a while, but it does make me happy seeing the characters that basically defined my childhood back on screen. Sure, Natsu and Lucy’s characters have never been much more complex than an idiot who blows things up and attractive female lead, but that does not mean they do not have their moments. 

I do also appreciate the story of the arc they are in right now, where the guild has disbanded after their insane battle with Tartaros, and now Natsu and Lucy are trying to get the guild back together. The concept behind it is not exactly the most original, but there are still enough interesting supporting characters in Fairytail that I am curious where they all ended up.  

The music, which has always been one of my favorite elements of the show, was also pretty good for the first episode, especially the opening and ending. Overall, it was a fun first episode, and I hope the show has some good storytelling for its last season.

Iroduku: The World in Colors Episode One Reaction

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I know I’m a bit late on these episode reactions, but I was on break when the season started. Anyway, here are my thoughts on P.A. Works newest creation, Iroduku: The World in Colors.

Screenshot 2018-11-12 00.05.36.png

Iroduku: The World in Colors is a story about Hitomi, a 17-year-old whose upbringing has been less than ideal. She lost her ability to see colors at a young age and has since then been devoid of emotion. Her grandmother, worrying about Hitomi’s future, decides to send her to the past in order to meet her younger grandmother.

You would think, given the premise, and given the amount of excitement going on in just the first episode, that this would be a show that I would instantly love, right? Well, you would be partially right.

Screenshot 2018-11-12 00.43.05.png

I cannot deny that, even in just its first episode, Iroduku presents a unique and interesting world, one in which technology and magic co-exist. My problem lies more in the execution, and how, despite having such an interesting premise, I don’t really feel any attachment to anything that’s happening on screen.

I attribute part of this to my own personal writing style. Normally, I would much rather have a character get at least an episode worth of backstory, and in Iroduku’s case, I think it makes a lot of sense. To me, it would be much more compelling if the show displayed some of the difficulty she has faced in her life because of her life as a mage and her color blindness.

Screenshot 2018-11-12 00.56.57.png

It would also make a lot more sense to establish her grandmother’s character, and explain why its important for Hitomi to go see her in the first place. With a better explanation of her grandmother’s character, I would feel a lot more invested into Hitomi’s journey into the past.

For me, the first episode just lacks a lot of impact, as well as concrete reasons as to why I should care. I will definitely watch a few more episodes just to see if my feelings change, but as of right now, I’m feeling kind of lukewarm about it.


What do you guys think of Iroduku: The World in Colors? Let me know in the comments below. Also, if you want to support the Aniwriter through donations or are just feeling generous, consider buying me a coffee on Ko-Fi. Otherwise, thanks for reading and bye for now, Friendos!