Tag Archives: Winter 2021

Winter 2021 Anime Season Overview

Welcome, weebs, to Animated Observations

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It seems like the response to the columns so far has been mostly positive, so here is another. This one is from a little earlier this year, in which I looked at the Winter season and its stacked list of sequels and new series, including…ugh, “Wonder Egg Priority.” Anyway, hope you enjoy this short bit of nostalgia for earlier this year.


Welcome back, tourists

Well…yeah, we’re here I guess. I don’t think most people expected the world to get much better just cause a cinderella crystal ball dropped when the clock struck midnight, but there is always that tiny feeling of hope. Anyway, back to anime.

With every change in the trees comes a change in TV, and man did the Winter 2021 season deliver in spades. The combination of a bunch of setbacks and delays for certain series culminated in one of the most exciting seasons of the last few years. There are lots of important sequels and some impressive newcomers to the scene, so let’s talk about it. 

When I say this season is stacked, I really mean it. Just of the most popular series, “Attack on Titan” is back for its fourth and final season, reaching the climax of its most recent arc. “The Promised Neverland” has returned for its second season, as the kids of a strange orphanage continue their dangerous journey.

On top of that, there are sequels for a few popular Isekai shows, including “Reincarnated as a Slime,” “Re:Zero,” and one of my personal favorites “Log Horizon.” Some fairly popular slice-of-life shows also got new seasons as well, including “Yuru Camp” and “Non-Non Biyori” getting their second and third seasons, respectively. 

On top of the high number of anticipated sequels, the Winter 2021 slate also brought with it some great new series. The first worth talking about is one that many have been anticipating since its announcement late last year. “Horimiya” is a romance show that focuses on two unlikely friends who quickly develop feelings for each other they are both too scared to admit.

The series centers on the idea that people usually have different personalities in different social situations. So far, at least, the show has not done a whole lot beyond that, but its pacing and the depth of its characters implies a much better story to come. 

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Whereas many people were excited for “Horimiya’s” adaptation, pretty much no one saw “Wonder Egg Priority” coming. This makes a bit of sense, though, as the original creator and scriptwriter, Saki Takahashi, has no other credited anime productions under his belt, and has only worked on a handful of relatively short manga before this. 

It may have come out of nowhere, but “Wonder Egg Priority” likely will not leave anyone’s memory for quite a while. It focuses on young girls who have gained the ability to enter a dream-like world where the task is to “break open eggs” and save the girls that come out of them from their trauma and abusers.

The subject matter by its self would make the show memorable, as it touches on everything from bullying, suicide, and sexual assault. However, it is that, combined with its colorful presentation, intricate and yet somehow earworm-y soundtrack, and nuanced characters that makes it so amazing. Not to mention the series is not even halfway done, and already appears to be an easy contender for anime of the year. 

One other show worth a brief mention is “EX-ARM,” a sci-fi series about a young high school student who hates machines, but who seemingly finds himself in the middle of robotic warfare. The newest Crunchyroll original, if the internet is to be believed, is one of if not the worst anime ever made. For people who find themselves fans of hate-watching, this might just be a good watch, though I cannot formally confirm or deny that. 

This definitely feels like one of the better seasons to come out in a while. Sequels, exciting originals, and garbage for people who enjoy garbage, I guess? Seems like there is something for everyone. 


How do you feel about the Winter 2021 season? Let me know in the comments. Feel free to also check out my column from last week where I discuss the cost of anime as a hobby.

If you are interested in reading more from me, check under blog to read my most recent stuff, or look below for some related posts. Also, if you would like to support Animated Observations, consider donating on Ko-fi or through paypal, or pledging on Patreon. You can even support by just liking and sharing this post.

Buy Me a Coffee at ko-fi.com

Check out my writing blog, Solidly Liquid!

If you can’t, or just don’t feel like it, no worries. Thank you all for reading, and goodbye, for now, friends!

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Discussing the Winter 2021 Anime Season

Welcome, weebs, to Animated Observations

Well…yeah, we’re here I guess. I don’t think most people expected the world to get much better just cause a cinderella crystal ball dropped when the clock struck midnight, but there is always that tiny feeling of hope. Anyway, back to anime.

With every change in the trees comes a change in TV, and man did the Winter 2021 season deliver in spades. The combination of a bunch of setbacks and delays for certain series culminated in one of the most exciting seasons of the last few years. There are lots of important sequels and some impressive newcomers to the scene, so let’s talk about it. 

When I say this season is stacked, I really mean it. Just of the most popular series, “Attack on Titan” is back for its fourth and final season, reaching the climax of its most recent arc. “The Promised Neverland” has returned for its second season, as the kids of a strange orphanage continue their dangerous journey.

On top of that, there are sequels for a few popular Isekai shows, including “Reincarnated as a Slime,” “Re:Zero,” and one of my personal favorites “Log Horizon.” Some fairly popular slice of life shows also got new seasons as well, including “Yuru Camp” and “Non-Non Biyori” getting their second and third seasons, respectively. 

On top of the high number of anticipated sequels, the Winter 2021 slate also brought with it some great new series. The first worth talking about is one that many have been anticipating since its announcement late last year. “Horimiya” is a romance show that focuses on two unlikely friends who quickly develop feelings for each other they are both too scared to admit.

The series centers on the idea that people usually have different personalities in different social situations. So far, at least, the show has not done a whole lot beyond that, but its pacing and the depth of its characters implies a much better story to come. 

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Whereas many people were excited for “Horimiya’s” adaptation, pretty much no one saw “Wonder Egg Priority” coming. This makes a bit of sense, though, as the original creator and scriptwriter, Saki Takahashi, has no other credited anime productions under his belt, and has only worked on a handful of relatively short manga before this. 

It may have come out of nowhere, but “Wonder Egg Priority” likely will not leave anyone’s memory for quite a while. It focuses on young girls who have gained the ability to enter a dream-like world where the task is to “break open eggs” and save the girls that come out of them from their trauma and abusers.

The subject matter by its self would make the show memorable, as it touches on everything from bullying, suicide, and sexual assault. However, it is that, combined with its colorful presentation, intricate and yet somehow earworm-y soundtrack, and nuanced characters that makes it so amazing. Not to mention the series is not even halfway done, and already appears to be an easy contender for anime of the year. 

One other show worth a brief mention is “EX-ARM,” a sci-fi series about a young high school student who hates machines, but who seemingly finds himself in the middle of robotic warfare. The newest Crunchyroll original, if the internet is to be believed, is one of if not the worst anime ever made. For people who find themselves fans of hate-watching, this might just be a good watch, though I cannot formally confirm or deny that. 

This definitely feels like one of the better seasons to come out in a while. Sequels, exciting originals, and garbage for people who enjoy garbage, I guess? Seems like there is something for everyone. 


How do you all feel about the winter season? Let me know in the comments below.

If you are interested in reading more from me, check under blog to read my most recent stuff, or look below for some related posts. Also, if you would like to support Animated Observations, consider donating on Ko-fi or through paypal, or pledging on Patreon. You can even support by just liking and sharing this post.

Buy Me a Coffee at ko-fi.com

Check out my writing blog, Solidly Liquid!

If you can’t, or just don’t feel like it, no worries. Thank you all for reading, and goodbye, for now, friends!

First Impressions: Wonder Egg Priority

Welcome, weebs, to Animated Observations

Hey, so remember how I have said for a while now that “The Promised Neverland” holds the spot for best first episode of all time? Yeah, there might just be a new contender in the category.

CloverWorks feels like a rising start when it comes to animation studios, in much the same way the MAPPA did half a decade prior. They have certainly proven themselves time and time again, with shows like “Bunny Girl Senpai” and “The Promised Neverland” already under their belt, and with a solid start to this season’s “Horimiya.” I give the credit to the studio as a whole with regards to “Wonder Egg Priority” for the simple fact that, outside of a scant list of episode credits, director Shin Wakabayashi has little to nothing under his belt.

This is not to say that he is doing a bad job, far from it. In fact, much in the same way that I felt like “The Promised Neverland” was an easy contender for anime of the year at the beginning of 2019, This series is clearly positioned in the same way. With that being said, lets discuss some of the reasons why.

Bullying is a topic that gets brought up a lot in anime, and I think for good reason. A lot of anime is targeted at kids, and bullying in school just so happens to be an issue that kids can relate to, so it makes sense. However, bullying is rarely ever as minor of an issue as someone getting pushed on the playground. In fact, it can often times result in someone’s suicide, which is the situation our main character Ai Ohto finds herself in, as she attempts to bring her friend Koito back to life by saving other girls from their trauma.

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The through line in “Wonder Egg Priority” is that all of its main characters have lost someone to suicide, and it is implied, though not directly stated, which I suspect will come into play much later, that by buying eggs and saving the girls inside them they will eventually be able to bring their late friends and family back to life. The most interesting cases so far are Ai herself, whose friend is implied to have been caught up in a scandal with the school councilor, along with Momoe, a masculine presenting girl who seems to have lost her first girlfriend after she confessed to her.

While its safe to say that most would probably put this under the genre label of magical girl, and while it does seem to borrow a bit from shows like “Madoka Magica” the series has already come very much into its own. there are a lot of shows that bring up the topics of bullying and abuse, but very rarely is it done well. The best example that comes to mind is the second season of “March Comes in Like a Lion.” What a lot of people tend to forget is that stuff like this often happens in silence, with very few people aware of what is actually going on, which is why it makes sense that the girls are transported to a dreamlike world to fight the enemies which are appropriately named “Seeno Evils.”

The show’s main character, Ai Ohto, is also extremely well written. In particular, her Heterochromia is an excellent visual characteristic that accomplishes a number of things. First, it gives her an immediate, stand out characteristic that makes the show that much more memorable. Because of this, it would also explain pretty reasonably why she would got bullied, as kids tend to latch on to things that are different about one another.

Lastly, her eyes serve as a great visual metaphor for a number of things, including how she can see both the real world and this new and exciting dream world, and how these can often blend together in dangerous ways. It could also represent the two different versions of herself that she sees, one that is a victim and one that is a savior.

How such an insanely good series came together is seemingly out of nowhere is still a ways beyond me. But, I will say this much: Given its current trajectory, this is on course to be an amazing series, and maybe even one of my favorites. However, only time will tell.


How do you all feel about “Wonder Egg Priority?” Let me know in the comments below.

If you are interested in reading more from me, check under blog to read my most recent stuff, or look below for some related posts. Also, if you would like to support Animated Observations, consider donating on Ko-fi or through paypal, or pledging on Patreon. You can even support by just liking and sharing this post.

Buy Me a Coffee at ko-fi.com

Check out my writing blog, Solidly Liquid!

If you can’t, or just don’t feel like it, no worries. Thank you all for reading, and goodbye, for now, friends!